Trauma to Maxillary Central Incisor. How to manage?

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Posted on By Lyubomir Danev In Anterior/Esthetic

Hello colleagues. This is a patient, an 11-year-old boy, who fractured tooth 11 (European classification) while playing . The child visited the office 7 days after the incident. Tooth 11 is still vital, but with an open pulp chamber and reduced vitality. The tooth has a 2nd degree of mobility. In addition to the large fracture of the crown, there is a second oblique fracture on the palatal side, which reaches the bony edge. Please guide me for the right approach to treatment!




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4 Comments

Pulp Cap with CaOH and Add Composite Resin to fractured site. Temporarily Splint to adjacent teeth using lingual bonded braided wire. Wait and Observe checking vitality and mobility over the next 3 months. Make sure the tooth is out of occlusion. Good luck Dr. Salama


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Thanks ! I will do everything as you recommended.


Reply

Over my 64 years of practice I have had a number of fractures in children similar to your case Dr. Salama has advised the best advice to follow. I would just like to add that I always used the least traumatic procedure as an interim crown which means direct composite bonding to provide both esthetics and function until a final decision is made for long term.


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Thanks !


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